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First Impressions

So, courtesy of ShifterCat on TypePad, I have obtained the book Edge of Apocalypse.

It’s a softcover edition, and is about an inch thick. Here’s the front cover, as shown in the image below:

Edge of Apocalypse Book Cover

Not bad.

The back cover reads, in part:

“Joshua Jordan, former U.S. spy-plane hero turned weapons designer, creates the world’s most sophisticated missile defense system, a laser shield code-named Return to Sender […]

With help from a group of powerfully connected Christian leaders known as The Patriots, Jordan works to save the nation from economic and moral collapse […]”

The full image is below:

Back cover of Edge of Apocalypse

The publisher is Zondervan, and in fact a quick Google search reveals a news release breathlessly putting forth bumpf like the following:

“Zondervan, a world leader in Christian communications, has signed an agreement with attorney Craig Parshall and Tim LaHaye, creator and co-author of the world renowned Left Behind series. Three years after the success of the Left Behind final installment, LaHaye returns to publish Edge of Apocalypse, an apocalyptic epic infused with political intrigue ripped from today’s headlines, the first book in a new series called The End.”

In addition, it promises that this series shall be “more innovative” than Left Behind.

Okay. I could live with that.

Let’s see if it turns out to be true.

As fans of Fred Clark’s Review and Analysis well know, it has been established to an almost painful extent that Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins (mostly Jenkins) simply do not know how to write believable characters or believable tales about those characters.

From gravely abusing the romance-comedy subplot, to having their characters act out implausible “got one over on you” type fantasy situations, the Left Behind books are not about drawing people to Christ or to be Christians, as they are about making them that bought the product feel good about it, to mangle a metaphor from an old movie I once watched.

I should parenthetically insert a disclaimer: I am an atheist, and have no intention of ever adopting a religion. As such I will be focussing more on what plausibilities or implausibilities arise in this book, as well as doing a compare-and-contrast with Left Behind.

After all, part of what will decide how good or bad this book is, will be whether the difference is in the author doing most of the grunt work. If Jenkins couldn’t do it, can Parshall? We’ll see.

Nevertheless I’ll try to intersperse the commentary on the book itself with connections to broader economic and social issues, especially as the book bumpf itself claims it to be “ripped from today’s headlines”.

So, on to Page 1!

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4 thoughts on “First Impressions

  1. “As fans of Fred Davis’s Review and Analysis well know, ”

    shouldn’t that be Fred Clark?

    Looking forward to reading the rest of this…

  2. Just found this via your comments on Slacktivist. I’m interested to see how this goes, although admittedly the first thing my brain pounced on and refused to let go of was the idea of a powerful organization known as the Patriots.

    I have no idea whether LaHaye and Parshall have ever even heard of something called “Metal Gear Solid”, but it left me paralyzed with laughter for a good few minutes. If they don’t include a former black ops man with an eyepatch, I might very well sue them for false advertising.

    Looking forward to reading your review, and good luck with the book!

    • Seconded. That was my first thought as well. I hope to let it color my entire experience with these reviews.

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